Common Clownfish Behavior You Need To Know – Do They Fight?

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Clownfish are some of the most exciting fish in any aquarium. Their clownish appearance and clown-like behavior make them a favorite among hobbyists and children alike.

Clownfish behavior are fascinating creatures. They live in clownfish communities and have evolved to communicate with one another using a variety of behaviors, some of which can even be seen outside the clownfish community. This blog post will take an in-depth look at clownfish behavior and see what makes them so attractive!

See also

  1. 4 Difference Between True vs False Percula Clownfish.
  2. Brooklynella Clownfish Disease: Symptoms And Best Treatment.
  3. Swim Bladder Disease Clownfish (3 Symptoms And Helpful Cure).

Clownfish Behavior

They guard their area as well as the ocean anemone in which they live. Clownfish feed on the anemone and algae leftovers from fish. Usually, they are pretty peaceful oceanic fish. However, avoid combining the several clown species. You most likely have a mix of clown species in your aquarium, and they may suffer.

You most likely have many anemones in the tank with them, and they will guard it. It usually works best if you only have one or two clowns in your tank.

Despite its endearing name, Clownfish may be rather violent. They are known to vigorously protect their area, especially after they have placed their eggs. They will attack divers if they get too close to “their” anemone, but they will even attack divers many meters away.

Aggression. Clownfish captured in the wild are pretty territorial. They’ve grown used to guarding their tiny home and host anemones against invasion or assault by other clownfish. For them, it’s either defend their area or die. Thus violence is a way of life.

normal clownfish behavior
Normal clownfish behavior

The clownfish may sleep on its side on the tank bottom. It may even live on the aquarium’s floor. It may also adopt a shell or hollowed-out piece of coral as a “pseudo-anemone” and can remain near to or on its adoptive “host.”

Clownfish (Amphiprion Ocellaris) live in tiny groups within a single anemone. A breeding pair lives alongside a few non-reproductive, “pre-pubescent,” and smaller male clownfish in the group.

When the feminine dies, the dominating male changes intercourse and becomes the feminine. This life history approach is known as sequential hermaphroditism. Clownfish are protandrous hermaphrodites because they are all born as males.

Clownfish Swim continually, especially if they don’t have a coral or Nem to host in. Two of mine spend the night in inexperienced star polyps, so they don’t swim much. My other three clowns swim all night long daily.

All anemonefish and clownfish are hermaphrodites. According to National Geographic, they are all born male. They can present themselves as feminine, but they cannot revert to being male once the shift is done. Typically, the transition occurs during mating. Two males will become partners, and the larger, dominating fish will become feminine.

According to the ADW, these social fish live in groups led by a dominating feminine. The dominant male is the second-largest fish in the group, whereas the rest are smaller males.

If the feminine dies, the dominant male will transform into a feminine to replace her. The largest of the lesser males will then emerge as the group’s dominant male. According to a study published in the journal PLOS One, clownfish communicate by generating popping and clicking noises.

According to the researchers, chatter helps group members maintain their rank and file. “Sound may be an interesting approach for ending the struggle amongst group members,” leading study creator Orphal College, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Liège in Belgium, told LiveScience in a 2012 piece.

Spinecheek anemonefish have a social hierarchy in which fish that occupy the same patch of anemones are ranked by size. Typically, there is a breeding couple followed by zero to four non-breeders.

The largest female in the group (highest rank) is adopted by the most significant male, part of the breeding pair. The second-largest shift from male to feminine occurred in the case of the feminine’s death. Measurement differentiation is maintained to keep subordinates from becoming a threat to the highest-ranking guy.

The related anemonefish, Amphiprion percula, has a substantial difference in rank of 10 mm. When a dominating anemonefish dies, the next subordinate rises through the rank order and grows.

The Spinecheek anemonefish is active all day. When they settle on an anemone as a juvenile, then as an adult, they remain in the same area for the rest of their lives.

Mates communicate during courting through mobility and touch. Females swim in a zig-zag pattern over the nest during the spawning process while the male fertilizes the eggs.

Habits 

Hermaphrodites include all anemonefish, including clownfish. According to National Geographic, they are all born male. They have the power to change their gender, but once done, they cannot return to being male. When mating, the transformation might occur. Two males will mate, with the bigger, dominant fish becoming the female.

common clownfish behavior
common clownfish behavior

According to the ADW, these sociable fish dwell in groups led by a dominant female. The dominating male is the second-largest fish in the group, with all of the other fish being smaller males. If the female dies, the dominant male will transform into a female to take her place. The largest of the lesser males will then become the group’s dominant male.

According to a study published in the journal PLOS One, clownfish communicate by generating popping and clicking noises. According to the researchers, chatter helps group members retain their rank and file. In a 2012 article, primary research author Orphal College, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Liège in Belgium, told LiveScience, “Sound might be an intriguing technique for reducing conflict between group members.”

Some Other Related Questions

How do you tell if clownfish are fighting?

A clownfish kept by itself will become a female in a short period if it is physically mature in as little as a month. 

Do clownfish like high flow?

Clowns aren’t big fans of high flow, but they’ll often avoid high flow areas in the tank.

Why are clownfish so aggressive?

Aggression. Clownfish captured in the wild are pretty territorial. They are accustomed to guarding their little area and host anemones from invasion or attack by other clownfish.

Conclusions

Hopefully with the above information will help you have more practical knowledge about clownfish behavior. I hope you will have a clownfish tank soon.

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